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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term, versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it's easy to point to the national security, or the economic consequences, or consequent impact on the ratin
landing on the streets here on the southwest side of the thames river. boris johnson the mayor, he said he just went to see the scene. we have not been allowed over there because this investigation is right in the thick of it. and he said that the scenes were so disturbing. he said, you know, there was the wing of the helicopter on top of a roof. there were big pieces of it had fallen on cars which were burned out and the side of a building went up in flames, all of that very quickly extinguished by firefighters in london. mayor johnson said he did not want to be glib for many people are in mourning for the people they lost in this tragic accident but frankly could have been more tragic if that helicopter hit a double-decker bus let's say. this happened in the middle of the city during rush hour. a lot of questions tonight being asked about safety in london. we don't have lots of skyscrapers here but more and more are going up. mayor johnson saying they will be looking very carefully into whether all of that is adequately lit. both cranes and construction sites. he said that for people who
, but the last time we took it seriously during the johnson years. that program started in washington. give me two minutes to give you some sense and this audience some sense of what has happened to poverty since 1989. talking specifically about income inequality -- the top 5% of washington, d.c., household -- in the nation's capital in the origination of the world -- the top 5% of households made more than $500,000 on average last year. top 5%. $500,000 on average last year. the bottom 20% made less than $9,500 last year. i'm no economist, but that is a ratio of 54 to one. the district of columbia, the nation's capital, is the worst of all the 50 states in the union. that is what income inequality looks like in the nation's capital. income inequality has increased in 49 of 50 states since 1989. the poverty rate increase in 43 states. most sharply in nevada. ravage of course by the housing bust, and in my home state of indiana, which sought a rise in low-paying jobs. in all 50 states, the richest 20% of households made far greater income gains than any other quintile, up 12% national ly. incom
vice president andrew johnson's drunken inaugural address. this is about an hour.>> thank you very much. that is a hard act to follow. i will try my best. we are about to have an inauguration on monday. the first question that comes to people's minds often in inauguration as they are standing or sitting in the cold waiting on the ceremonies to begin is we have separation of powers in this country. how is it that the president of the united states is being sworn into office on the steps of the capitol t legislative branch of the government. how did this all come about? it's not in the constitution. if you read the constitution it's sparse. it tells you the date and time the president is to be sworn in and the exact words of the oath but it doesn't say anything else. but yet we have this long two centuries of tradition built up around presidential inaugurations. it comes down to which came first, the chicken or the egg. and the fact is in 1979 when this brand new government was getting started the first part of government to meet was the congress. it was supposed to meet on march 4 but co
released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president biden in the white house, the entire house democratic leadership, senate majority caucus, and rising leaders such as senator marco rubio, and other key decision-makers, pushing for action to the fiscal cliff. during those meetings we made it known that cities have already led on deficit reduction. mayors know how to balance budgets. [applause] we do it every day. we do it every year. through this recession we made the tough decisions that washington has been unwilling to make. while we also maintained key investmen
. curriculum deviation, i was fired. i was hired shortly after by the johnson administration. [laughter] my favorite worldwide poet happens to be the irish poet. there are lines many of us learn in school and forget. he said, the best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity. we need that passionate intensity on our side, on the side of the poor children in this earth. i beg the president to summon up the courage to give us that voice. if he does not, it would be a terrible betrayal of his role and he will miss an opportunity to leave behind a beautiful legacy in history. it will be his tragedy as well as ours. [applause] >> we are clearly headed to a real debate about austerity. i do not believe austerity is the answer. some people do. there is a big debate in the coming weeks as we get to this debt ceiling debate. talk to me, from your perspective, about this notion of compassionate conservatism. there was a movement 12 years ago to present that as an alternative. what happened to that? >> i would be glad to go down that road but i do not think it is useful. in
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
. it was considered dangerous. curriculum deviation, i was fired. i was hired shortly after by the johnson administration. [laughter] my favorite worldwide poet happens to be the irish poet. william butler yeats. there are lines many of us learn in school and forget. he said, the best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity. we need that passionate intensity on our side, on the side of the poor children in this earth. i beg the president to summon up the courage to give us that voice. if he does not, it would be a terrible betrayal of his role and he will miss an opportunity to leave behind a beautiful legacy in history. it will be his tragedy as well as ours. [applause] >> we are clearly headed to a real debate about austerity. i do not believe austerity is the answer. some people do. there is a big debate in the coming weeks as we get to this debt ceiling debate. talk to me, from your perspective, about this notion of compassionate conservatism. there was a movement 12 years ago to present that as an alternative. what happened to that? >> i would be glad to g
johnson, was in power. this president has made no secret of his ambition to be the fourth transformative president. and the question is, will he, in his speech today, show a kind of combative nature that led to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're goin
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
government. peter johnson him up box these legal -- legal analyst. good to have you with this. that is precisely what the president is talking about doing >> with like this notion of having doctors ask people of whether they have guns in their home. what is the next step? was this part of obamacare to begin with? was as part of the plan by which the government becomes literally big brother peering into the hall saying, okay, tell me about yourself road and also tell me whether their is a beretta in your house. if you tell me that that i may have the obligation to report it to the federal government or face an economic or other disciplinary sanction. that is outrageous, and that is scary. lou: as you heard the attorney generals say, he had expected the president to go farther than he did today with his executive initiatives, whether they be memoranda or executive orders. tell what you? >> he has some understanding of the constitution, but the spirit of the executive orders is in derogation of the second amendment. let me do what i can to keep score and end humiliation and been
the following five members to keck it off. congresswoman eddie bernice johnson of texas, congresswoman joyce -- representative hall from new jersey, representative fran tell from florida, representative velazquez of new york, representative bona meechoo -- bonamici from oregon. >> thank you very much, madam chairman. my question probably is a very broad one and widespread and probably directed to the mayor and the chief of police. with all the budgetary restraints that we suffer throughout this country, certainly here, do you think that you could have an effective program without federal funding? >> no. >> we're going to take all five questions at one time. >> mr. holt. >> thank you for the stories, they certainly make one cry, they should make one angry and outraged and determined an committed. why is america so different in the statistics you gave us, mayor nutter? >> you know, it's not -- it's not that we have less health care or so many more defenseless students, it's not only american youth who play violent video games. it's not that we have so little information about bad guys. and yet
. it was one of those it davies where indiana beat minnesota. one of those days-and we watched johnson came it was exciting, thrilling. and there was a lot of excitement and action. going back to back to back. three, four, five episodes in a row. >> the 24 reference and by the way, the indian the victory. the sister of harbaugh is married to an one of the affiliate's of the indiana team. >> bob melvin is expected to stay until a 2016. and the a's have avoided arbitration with george kottrais. and i do not know why they portend mayor ed 212 was george? jason used to work with jim hill and the los angeles. and george gutiterez hit 2120 and jason? buster posy he is the mvp. he is not want to play in this world class. ryan vogelson this could be a $20 million per year. why would you risk injury playing in this world of baseball classic. but they have to do it after this season but do not have it in march when everybody is ready for their regular games. lance armstrong. is going to sit down with oprah winfrey it will be on thursday. he will admit that they used performance enhancing drugs. and
and former star kevin johnson six weeks to present a counteroffer. there are reports that san francisco-based investors chris hansen is close to buying the kings for $500 billion and he would relocate the team up to portland. something sacramento fans are trying -- >> to keep from happening, yes. >>> later this morning, president obama outlines his gun proposals. also today, a new ad just released by the nra calling the president a hypocrite. >>> a school bus strike in new york city. how schools are still trying to get to students to classes during this lockout. and they're off! let's see what today has in store. change flight to tomorrow. [ announcer 2 ] that's not a problem on southwest... they don't charge a fee when your plans change. but the other airlines could hit him for 150 bucks in change fees. oh!! that's going to sting his bottomline. he's onboard with no change fees. business travelers win with southwest. >>> another cold morning. clear skies. temperatures will start to warm up a little bit. patchy fog starting to creep back in i think over the next few days. >>> 8:14. new
in these four years, j. johnson at the pentagon gave a speech saying we need to think about when we bring the war on terror to a close. when is it over? >> it's never over. >> that is the problem. we had a person on the program who is the only one to vote against the use of military force. it's the document from which all authority flows. she is proposing we repeal that operation. we are out of afghanistan. osama bin laden is dead. al qaeda is the al qaeda that attacked us has been destroyed. >> if you do it and there's an attack on american soil then you are the president who ended the war on terror. this is a president of any ideology, of any party. >> 1,000% the problem. >> yeah. >> you are taking on tremendous political risk. the reason they endure is because part of the calculation is that. if you are the one -- this is true about guantanamo. if they had closed guantanamo and took the right position to close it. it's not closed because of congressional opposition. if you close it and god forbid someone who is a guantanamo deta detainee, the political blowback would be insane. it's no
the inauguration on television. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bullet proof inaugural. ronald reagan's second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. bill clinton ushering in more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. >> i, william jefferson clinton. >> reporter: and president obama with the first lady by his side again after already making history four years ago in front of nearly 2 million spectators. david muir, abc news, washington. >> he'll be the first democrat in more than 75 years to get a majority of the popular vote twice. only five other presidents have done that in all u.s. history. i love the trivia behind inauguration. it's interesting to go back in the file that day. fascinating day for the obamas and for the country. so keep it here on abc news throughout this very big day. we'll be back. >>> this morning on "world news now," capitol celebration. washington's big bash as president obama begins his second term. >> the festive atmosphere and the tight security for this inau
. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. >>> standing at the president's side today over at the white house, four children each of whom wrote him letters like this one which reads -- and let me read it to you. i am writing you to ask you to stop gun violence. jessica yellin spoke to some of the children after the white house event. watch this. >> reporter: what inspired you to write the president? >> well, i was so overwhelmed with sadden with the sandy hook shooting and i knew that as one person i couldn't do anything but i knew that president obama could. so i decided to write him a letter. >> reporter: what do you hope can happen? >> well, i hope it's much harder for people to buy guns. i hope that like people with mental illness can't buy a gun and -- yeah. >> reporter: tell me a little bit about what you said in the letter. >> well, basically i just said that i hoped that he would do something and i said that i have four brothers and sisters and i would be sad if one of them passed away and i also told him that i know that laws have
with regard to my schedule and the opportunity. congresswoman johnson, you asked a question with regard to, can we really -- we do what we do with what we have. as part of my testimony, i talked about dealing with these issues at the federal level. in the aftermath of 9/11, the united states said we will do whatever it takes to make sure we are safe. what i want is someone to say we will do whatever it takes walking. i want to be safe in my neighborhood. i want my children to go to school. i want the same response to international terrorism to domestic terrorism icy on a regular basis. funding, personnel, equipment, support, technology. a focus on regular basis that domestic terrorism is as important as international terrorism. you almost have to take all of your clothes off to get in an airplane. one guy had a bomb in his shoe, and yet all of us take off our shoes to get on the airplane. that is fine. i want to be safe. we cannot do what we need to do without serious focused federal support. that is what the idea is out. a 9/11 commission told us what we need to be doing to be safe in the
aboard air force one when lyndon johnson took the oath of office. there is no constitutional requirement and a woman could add merit oath of office to the president if they choose. but because tradition started with thomas jefferson, i want the chief justice of the united states, that's basically been the unbroken line. eight times it has not been the chief justice. >> probably one of the best inaugurations with the weather. near 40 degrees today. >> the original inauguration day was march 4 because they wanted to get it out of the bad weather. that's when one president william henry harrison died in cold and drafty weather. they did not like the lame duck sessions that were causing everyone grief, they moved it to january 20. that started in 1937. >> all right. thanks. >> michael will be with us throughout the morning. we'll be talking inauguration and carrying it for you live. there's the vice president biden coming out right now. the ceremony will start in about 20 minutes. >> we'll get back to washington, d.c. first in the bay area we're looking at nice weather. >> good morning. temp
't they do like johnson did. they built fences around every wrecking yard and scrap yard and junkyard in america on the highways. they build all these fences around every school where nobody can see in, and if they put somebody there at the gates like they did in the airports and things like that. host: the nra bought it up. guest: they were highly criticized for that press conference a few weeks ago. again, a difference in opinion on how we should go about making schools safer. from the democratic perspective, the fewer guns, the less likely that there will be violent and dangers in our schools. from the gun control opponents, people who do not want to see restrictions, they should be about keeping the schools safer from a person who is mentally unbalanced, marching in with their weapons. and there is controversy about that. you heard obama speak about this a couple weeks ago when he laid out his initiative, and he talked about providing resources officers to school and access occurred 84 schools that wanted it. he did not want to force it. you do not want to turn a school fortress.r
part. lyndon johnson did, bill clinton did. he doesn't. >> so even though the kids are going to be out of the house, so to speak, you don't expect him to change? >> i think it would being a great. designee just made a joke the kids are moving out, come on over. >> it's >>> the cars of tomorrow, they're on display today at the detroit auto show. we'll show you the cars and the truck that give you the best bang for your buck. >>> and take look at the groundbreaking new corvette stingray. all right. pretty. you're watching "cbs this morning." t he do it with >> announcer: this morning's eye opener at 8:00 is brought to you by sponsor with an inside story on shingles. democrats? e >>> planning for your retirement is more important than ever, so why are more people raiding their 401(k)s to pay their bills? "moneywatch" jill schlesinger is back and she'll show you why it's so important to save and why it's so important to never touch your 401(k). >>> a little later? >>> i'm charlie d'agata in london and i'll tell you why the great british butler is making a g
. >> another downgrade on johnson. >> they're not hurt by this business. i've got to tell you, carl, there are too many analysts who are negative. they say the stock is up too high. what happens if we break out? >> you talked about the danger of downgrades yesterday. >> you know, like i don't like -- i think it was at 65. what do you do? do you suddenly start liking it again? a lot of people fell off the horse. >> what's coming up tonight? >> the ultimate china play is joy global. straightest shooting ceo i know. he'll tell us about electricity demand and coal demand. india, china, i think the stock is a buy. everybody wroe him off at 55. that was a mistake. >> on a day when a lot of people are talking reacceleration. jim, 6:00 and 11:00 eastern time. minutes away from breaking news on home builder sentiment. a hot sector already. a lot more on the earnings showdown between goldman and jpmorgan. which is the better play? don't go away. obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks
. >> steve: joining us is fox news legal analyst peter johnson, jr. we sat in these chairs four years ago. has he kept that promise? >> i think today is a day for new beginning, steve. in some ways he has not kept those promises. this is a at this of great anticipation. it's momentous in our american pageant. it's a day when we say that common ground is the most important part of our lives. common ground, though, means yielding ground. common ground doesn't merely mean allowing people to come sit with you on your side. you need to say, i'm going to give up something in exchange for your participation in the process. i think that's what a lot of americans are hoping for today in this speech. i think a successful inaugural speech is measured by its ability to convince a president's detractors, to convince a president's opponents that they are welcome, that they are part of the process, that they are part of this incredible country. and i hope that he is successful in doing that today on this important day. >> steve: you're not alone. people want stuff done, but if you look at what we've hea
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)